Immigration Law Blog

Clenched fist painted in the US flag punchig the word immigration/american immigration policy concept. Immigration Policy hurts business

Are Trump’s Immigration Policies Bad For Business?

The New York Times just published an article entitled: Companies Say Trump Is Hurting Business by Limiting Legal Immigration. That’s a pretty big statement, but it follows the logic of my recent blog post entitled: Immigrants Have a Positive Impact on the Economy, Why Are We Trying To Block Them? While the…

Keep Reading
The Worst Mistake In the Naturalization Process

The Worst Mistakes In the Naturalization Process

All parents want to protect their children.  But all parents make mistakes. So many mothers and fathers fail to take care of getting their children naturalized. This is the worst mistake in the naturalization process. And the real shame of it, almost always, is that the error is unintentional. Why is…

Keep Reading

Do you really need to hire a lawyer when getting a green card through marriage?

UPDATE: THE RISK OF FIGHTING DEPORTATION HAS BEEN RAISED

On July 5, 2018, USCIS released guidance about Notices to Appear (NTA). An NTA is the document that Immigration authorities use to initiate removal (deportation) cases. NTAs demand that immigrants must appear before the US Immigration Court.

Up until now, it was commonplace for Immigration and Customs Enforcement to issue NTAs.

But the new policy places this role on USCIS, to serve NTAs when virtually any immigration application is denied.

Why you need a lawyer to get a Green Card through Marriage.

People always ask me, “Do I need a lawyer to get a green card through marriage?”

The answer is – this is too important to fool around with.

Many sites make green card applications seem simple: like a filling out a simple stack of papers and just going to an immigration office. Just download the application and hand it in. But do NOT be fooled.

If you go on your own without a lawyer present you may make the smallest mistake, something that just seems like it’s not a big deal, but sometimes those small mistakes cause BIG problems. Green card applications are not a walk in the park, they are complicated and sensitive legal documents that can affect your ability – or your spouse and children’s ability- to live and work in the U.S.

  • In fact, in June 2015, the U.S Citizenship and Immigration Services estimated that it takes an average of 6.5  hours required to fill out the new Form I-485 for permanent residence.
  • And you have to add supplements to the basic green card application form, which will add hours of your time to do it. If that’s a walk in the park, it’s more like a big game reserve in the wild.
  • I meet many clients who try to fill out green card applications on their own before they realize how complicated the process can be, and reach out to get help from an immigration lawyer.

Sometimes the delay of having to refile forms that were not correctly filled out in the first place can cost months of time away from a job, loved one, or family. While it is possible to download and file a green card application on your own, it can end up costing time, and causing errors that might ultimately affect your chances of getting permanent residency.

AND marrying a US citizen does not automatically guarantee that you will even get a green card.

Look, it’s your life, you can do what you want. When I need help with something that isn’t involving immigration law, I’m not going to try to do it myself. I’m going to call another attorney and say, “somebody came in and asked me a question about about divorce law, criminal law, and so forth, can you help?” You need to talk to people who are that are experts in those areas.  When it comes to immigration law, and in this instance again, green cards regarding marriage with a U.S. citizen; you want someone in the room when the immigration officer is interviewing you about your marriage. You want someone with you to prepare the forms carefully.

Even the smallest mistake can result in failure.  You want success, don’t you?

Leave Comment
How does a government shut down affect immigration? Government shut down sign

How government shutdowns impact immigration

While the Trump shutdown lasted only a weekend, many of our clients were asking: how does this impact our immigration case? For any future shutdowns, we have created a general list of what is affected, and what maintains the status quo. When the government is in shutdown mode, many government…

Keep Reading
Two hands with US flag, saying "Im a dreamer". DACA not dead

DACA “not dead yet”: renew DACA now!

Federal judge William Alsop in San Francisco has blocked Trump’s administration from ending DACA. Claiming that the move to rescind the program was based on “a flawed legal premise,” he ruled that the program must be left in place until the litigation to remove it has been decided. Dreamers’ lives…

Keep Reading
Green card: marriage vs employment

Getting a Green Card: Marriage vs. Employment

You have a handful of choices when seeking permanent residence in the United States. Most people usually choose between getting a green card through family, particularly marriage, or looking at employment visas. There are varying waiting times for many immigrants in different relative classifications, from siblings of citizens to the…

Keep Reading
Chain migration is legal immigration, a chain fence with barb wire stretches into the horizon

What is “chain migration”? Director of USCIS refers to legal family immigration as “a problem”

Over the weekend Fox news published an article entitled: White House releases ‘explosive’ tally of green cards issued in ‘chain migration’. In this “Exclusive” about chain migration, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Director Lee Cissna is quoted as saying: “For years, we’ve known that large numbers of immigrants have been coming based…

Keep Reading
What is DACA

What is DACA and why should you care?

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) was officially terminated in September of 2017, and has been in the news a lot since then. What is DACA, what has changed? And why should you care? The history of DACA In the summer of 2012, following 2 years of protest and…

Keep Reading